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BEST OF REYKJAVlK IS HERE AGAIN

BEST OF REYKJAVlK IS HERE AGAIN

Published July 19, 2012

Our BEST OF REYKJAVÍK LIST is here! Again we’ve spent countless hours compiling the thing [via your suggestions, e-mails, Facebook comments and bar-talk], and as always we are sure you are more than ready to contest and challenge every single entry.
And this is the point. We should strive to spend our time having conversations about stuff in our environment that contributes to our quality of life. We need to care about our surroundings and show love for the things we are thankful for.
As we like to lazily copy/paste on this occasion: “We love the great city of Reykjavík. We really do. In fact, we love it so much, we named our magazine after it—and most of us choose to live here for extended periods at a time. It really is an excellent little city, all things considered. Of course it’s lacking in many things a city will need. Decent public transport, actual neighbourhoods, a variety of ethnic eateries, clubs for late night partying on weekdays and about a million people, to name but a few. But we still swear by it, and if you’re reading this, chances are you do too.”
What follows are some nice tips on some of what makes Reykjavík-life worthwhile, some good entries into a hopefully neverending discussion. The primary purpose of this BEST OF REYKJAVÍK thing is celebration! It’s about big-upping stuff, giving mad props to it and patting it on the shoulder.
Our list is of course by no means a scientific one, and it is certainly contestable. It should be used as a starting point for a conversation; something for you to read, verify, distrust, totally disagree with, argue over, send us angry rants about and enjoy.
Here’s how we do it: Ever since spring 2009 we’ve been accepting readers thoughts on what’s BEST at bestof@grapevine.is, as well as conducting random polls on our Facebook, on the street and at the bar. Using your suggestions and arguments for guidance, we then assembled a couple of panels of tasteful folks that represent most genders, income brackets and political affiliations. Below are the results. Enjoy, and remember to send your suggestions to bestof@grapevine.is for consideration in our 2013 edition.
Read REYKJAVÍK INSTITUTIONS here
Read BEST OF REYKJAVíK: Dining & Grubbing here
Read BEST OF REYKJAVíK: Shopping & Commerce here
Read BEST OF REYKJAVíK: Drinking & Nightlife here
Read BEST OF REYKJAVíK: Activities & Fun-Times here



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