Björk On Magma Energy

Published May 21, 2010

Dear friends,
I can no longer remain silent on the very pressing subject that is the selling off of Iceland’s nature.
I hereby challenge the government of Iceland to do everything in its power to revoke the contracts with Magma Energy that entitle the Canadian firm complete ownership of HS Orka. These are abhorrable deals, and they create a dangerous precedent for the future. They directly go against necessary and oft-repeated attempts to create a new policy in the energy- and resource management of this nation.
Warmly,
Björk Guðmundsdóttir


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