A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again
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Sirkus: the 11th Hour

Sirkus: the 11th Hour

Published February 8, 2008

On January 25 – 27, legendary bar Sirkus on Klapparstígur marked its impending closing and demolition with a three-day-long series of concerts during which more than 50 “friends of Sirkus” performed. The bands, (pictured clockwise from top,) included Hjaltalín, Sigur Rós, and Jan Mayen, among others. Squeezing into the tiny pub throughout the weekend was a crowd that was not only unrelenting but distinctly dissimilar to what is known as the usual “Sirkus crowd.” It seems that the farewell ceremony was also cause for a little late night tourism for those who infrequently or never had stepped inside the pub. The weekend was nonetheless a great success, and rallied, among other things, a hoard of signatures for an online petition against the demolition of the house, which was presented to Mayor Ólafur F. Magnússon on January 30. Sirkus is however, currently closed and the lot waiting further development later this year.



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Workers Unite!

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Earlier this month, a news story broke in the Icelandic media that a young Icelandic girl working at Lebowski Bar was fired after she asked to be paid minimum wage—effectively a pay rise over what she was getting. The story sparked shock and outrage amongst many. To others, it was merely par for the course. Restaurants, bars and clubs in Iceland are notorious for the use of what is known as jafnaðarkaup (“median pay”)—a form of wage offsetting. By most collective bargaining agreements in the service industry, a worker is supposed to receive a base hourly wage, plus an extra

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News In Brief Late August

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Unless you’ve been literally living in a cave for the past two weeks, chances are that you’ve heard of the possible eruption at Bárðarbunga peak. In the end (at the time of writing), this insufferable geological formation didn’t have the decency to erupt even a little bit, let alone disrupt air travel across the European continent. Instead, it rumbled, made some tremors, fooled scientists into thinking a small eruption was underway when there totally wasn’t, annoyed farmers affected by the evacuation of the area, spawned endless alarmist articles in the international press, and failed to destroy the Kárahnjúkar Dam. Worst.

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Schrödinger’s Volcano

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On August 16, the Western media spotlight fell on Iceland once again. As is usually the case when the outside world likes to acknowledge our existence, an eruption was involved. Or was there? That day it became known that there had been a slow and steady build-up of unusually strong seismic activity at Bárðarbunga, Vatnajökull Glacier’s highest peak. All signs indicated that a subglacial volcano was about to erupt. International headlines ranged from modest “Bardarbunga eruption sparks red travel alert,” to the slightly more worrying “Eruption May Cause Monumental Flood,” to the cataclysmic “Icelandic volcano could trigger Britain’s coldest winter

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Let The Gaymes Begin!

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A group of handsome young men gather in the historic city of Rome this week, in the hopes of winning the title of Mr Gay World, an annual beauty pageant for gay rights. The winner of the competition gets to travel all over the world as a global representative for the international gay community. Our very own Iceland has a hopeful delegate in this year’s running, the super charismatic Mr Troy Michael. “I love the gay scene in Iceland. It’s just so great and almost the whole country was at Gay Pride and everything. It’s so awesome,” says Troy. With Iceland’s gay-friendly laws

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Dyngjujökull Glacier Photo Gallery

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On August 21, photographer Axel Sigurðarson flew over Dyngjökull glacier in a two-seater airplane through Mýflug Air. He didn’t see any volcanic eruption, but snapped some gorgeous shots for us—check them out below. See more Eruption Iceland stories.

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“They Are A Gruesome Lot”

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It is thought that the first cats touched Icelandic soil in the tenth century, accompanied by human settlers. Those first Icelandic cats did not leave much of a mark on history. Though cats appear in Nordic mythology and Icelandic folklore, our furry friends are seldom mentioned in Icelandic historical chronicles, sagas or other ancient literature. A notable exception to this is ‘Vatnsdæla saga’ (‘The Saga Of The People Of Vatnsdalur’), a thirteenth century family chronicle about Ingimundur the Old, the first settler in Vatnsdalur valley in northern Iceland, and his offspring. In one chapter, Ingimundur’s two sons, Þorsteinn and Jökull,

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