Mag
Being Vegetarian In Iceland

Being Vegetarian In Iceland

Words by

Published April 3, 2012

After a few weeks in Reykjavík, I immediately felt welcome, and it was easy to adjust to everyday life. As a vegetarian, however, I struggled a bit to find exciting food options. Of course you get all the veggies and fruit you want at the supermarkets, and the prices are even okay, but when it comes to restaurants or take away food, the options are rather slim.
Nearly every supermarket sells a variety of sandwiches, but they typically only have one vegetarian option at the most, and the smaller shops don’t have any. Most of the coffee shops have sandwiches on offer as well, but you have to know where to go to get vegetarian ones. A tip: Litli Bóndabærinn offers wonderful vegetarian sausage rolls and paninis.
And the further you travel outside Reykjavík, the slimmer the chance gets that you might find something vegetarian on the menu (I couldn’t find a veggie sandwich in Selfoss to save my life). And I can’t imagine how difficult it must be for vegans.
While I could probably survive on kleinur and flatkökur, it’s good to know some restaurants and cafés where you can have a nice meal out with friends. So here are some options that I’ve discovered for all the vegetarians out there.
Restaurants:
Grænn Kostur, Skólavörðustígur 8b. A lovely, small restaurant that also offers vegan food. Their special of the day is 1590 ISK.
Á Næstu Grösum, Laugavegur 20b. This restaurant on the first floor of 20b is currently closed for renovations, but will reopen soon.
Kaffihúsið Garðurinn (“Ecstasy’s Heart-Garden”), Klapparstígur 37. A small restaurant that offers a special of the day (1500 ISK) and a soup of the day (950 ISK).
Gló, Engjateig 19. This is not a strictly vegetarian restaurant, but it offers healthy vegetarian dishes that are cooked at 47°C or less. Their special of the day is 1690 ISK.
Cafés:
C is for Cookie, Týsgata 8. A cosy café in the heart of Reykjavík. In addition to their vegetarian dishes, they offer a vegan soup and cake every day.
Café Babalú, Skólavörðustígur 22a. A small coffee shop that offers coffee with soymilk and vegan muffins and cakes. The American owner prepares everything according to his own recipes.

Disclaimer: This list of vegetarian restaurants and cafés is limited to downtown Reykjavík and may not be complete


Mag
Which Way 
The Wind Blows

Which Way 
The Wind Blows

by

“This is what we call a ‘washing board,’” our guide Kormákur Hermannsson says, his voice barely intelligible as we jostle violently on the bumpy mountain road. Indeed it feels like we are driving over one. It’s been nine hours since we set off from Reykjavík to see the Holuhraun eruption in Iceland’s remote highlands, and we are shaking. To our right, the sun is a blinding red ball peeking out from behind the clouds. Mount Herðubreið looms over an orange haze that blankets the horizon. We are still a few hours away from the eruption, yet its presence is unmistakeable.

Mag
Sour Grapes & Stuff: Issue 13, 2014

Sour Grapes & Stuff: Issue 13, 2014

by

Say your piece, voice your opinion, send your letters to letters@grapevine.is Most Awesome Letter of the Issue Dear Grapevine. I have recently returned from another visit to your beutifull country. I have family conections there and visit regularly. This time I was there with 9 other members of my family and this is the very first time I have had unplesant experiances in Iceland. It all started at the Blue Lagoon when we all arrived for the usual ritual bathe, my wife who is 69 and not keen an the experiance decided to sit in the coffee shop with a

Mag
What Will Become Of Bárðarbunga?

What Will Become Of Bárðarbunga?

by

Bárðarbunga: it’s going to explode, you’re going to be trapped in Iceland for six months and you might die a horrific, fiery death. Why? Because such grand claims make good headlines and sell papers, that’s why. Personally, I’ve always believed more in science than sensationalism, so if you’ll permit me, I’d love to spread a little of that… The situation at Bárðarbunga is quite complex and, as such, presents a range of possibilities. Most of these possibilities are exciting; some of them are dangerous; none of them are terrifying. Let’s take a look at the first possibility: there is no

Mag
Readers’ Huldu-fólktales

Readers’ Huldu-fólktales

by

Since our Hidden People issue came out on Friday, readers have been submitting their own elf-encounter tales left and right. Here are a couple of the submissions we’ve received so far; send us yours at grapevine@grapevine.is and we’ll add to the collection! If you’d like to read more Hidden People folktales in translation, check out “Hidden People, They’re Just Like Us (Kind Of)” and “Hidden People Folktales.” *** i spent july in olafsfjordur at the listhus artist residency.  and i was up there looking for trolls.  but i haven’t seen any that aren’t rock.  i was out in the evening

Mag
Bursting With Pride

Bursting With Pride

by

Wow! How awesome was Reykjavík Pride this year? I mean, did you see Páll Óskar’s glittering swan? A.M.A.Z.I.N.G. It is estimated that over 90,000 took to the streets of Reykjavík for Pride 2014, to celebrate diversity and show support for all people. “This year’s Pride was a fabulous mix of celebration, education and a powerful reminder of the work that still needs to be done regarding LGBTQI issues,” says Eva María Þórarinsdóttir Lange, Chair of Reykjavík Pride. “The parade was a meaningful glitter bomb!” Yup, for this edition of Pride, the sun was shining (thanks for coming out, sun!), spirits

Mag
Plastic, Not So Fantastic

Plastic, Not So Fantastic

by

On June 28, the 5 Gyres Institute sailed into Reykjavík following a three-week expedition during which they collected marine plastic samples from Bermuda to Iceland. Led by half-Icelandic Research Director Dr. Marcus Eriksen, a super-crew consisting of 13 advocates, sailing experts, artists, journalists, students and others set out with the goal of researching the North Atlantic and subpolar gyres. Gyres are large rotating ocean current systems that accumulate what is estimated to be hundreds of thousands of tonnes of plastic that makes its way into the world’s oceans. Few would be better suited to carry out this research than the

Show Me More!