Music
Review
+-

GP!: Elabórat

Published August 8, 2012

No, it’s not the soundtrack to a Spanish-language version of a Sacha Baron Cohen film, but rather the first solo album of guitar virtuoso Guðmundur Pétursson (here, handily renamed GP!). GP! (then still only Guðmundur Pétursson) was once proclaimed the greatest unknown guitarist in the world by no lesser an authority than Steve Vai of Whitesnake, and has gone on to session work for a whole generation of Icelandic musicians.
Here, respective frontmen are left at home, and the album starts well with the first few bars of “The Good Life.” Then nothing much happens. This exercise is repeated throughout. Each song starts promisingly, but GP! (The artist formerly known as Guðmundur Pétursson) is just too pop and not avant-garde enough for a whole album of instrumentals. Pop music needs its choruses, and a guest singer or two (come on, GP!, we know you have them on your speed-dial) would have been most welcome. Meanwhile, GP! had best not give up his day-job as plain old Guðmundur Pétursson.


Culture
Album review
Bitter & Resentful

Bitter & Resentful

by

Well, he isn’t really, although he comes close on “The Lovers” a giddy duet in which he and his female

Culture
Album review
The Tower Of Foronicity

The Tower Of Foronicity

by

Psychotic from moment one, “You Drive Me Insane” explodes into your consciousness like plunging down the first hill on a

Culture
Album review
Innra

Innra

by

Rökkurró’s third album ‘Innra’ (or “inner”) comes to us four years after their quiet but stunning sophomore outing, ‘Í annan

Culture
Album review
Ascending//Descending

Ascending//Descending

by

‘Ascending//Descending’ is the debut effort of Icelandic hardcore upstarts Icarus, which makes the mastery of the metallic hardcore genre displayed

Culture
Album review
Aeoline

Aeoline

by

DADA is the musical outlet of one Sigtryggur Ari Jóhannsson, who creates music inspired by mid-century analog synthesizers and the

Culture
Album review
Vulnicura

Vulnicura

by

Björk albums usually appear with quite a fanfare. But ‘Vulnicura’, the bleak and wintery eighth album of her adult solo

Show Me More!