Music
Review
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GP!: Elabórat

Published August 8, 2012

No, it’s not the soundtrack to a Spanish-language version of a Sacha Baron Cohen film, but rather the first solo album of guitar virtuoso Guðmundur Pétursson (here, handily renamed GP!). GP! (then still only Guðmundur Pétursson) was once proclaimed the greatest unknown guitarist in the world by no lesser an authority than Steve Vai of Whitesnake, and has gone on to session work for a whole generation of Icelandic musicians.
Here, respective frontmen are left at home, and the album starts well with the first few bars of “The Good Life.” Then nothing much happens. This exercise is repeated throughout. Each song starts promisingly, but GP! (The artist formerly known as Guðmundur Pétursson) is just too pop and not avant-garde enough for a whole album of instrumentals. Pop music needs its choruses, and a guest singer or two (come on, GP!, we know you have them on your speed-dial) would have been most welcome. Meanwhile, GP! had best not give up his day-job as plain old Guðmundur Pétursson.


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