Music
Review
+-

GP!: Elabórat

Published August 8, 2012

No, it’s not the soundtrack to a Spanish-language version of a Sacha Baron Cohen film, but rather the first solo album of guitar virtuoso Guðmundur Pétursson (here, handily renamed GP!). GP! (then still only Guðmundur Pétursson) was once proclaimed the greatest unknown guitarist in the world by no lesser an authority than Steve Vai of Whitesnake, and has gone on to session work for a whole generation of Icelandic musicians.
Here, respective frontmen are left at home, and the album starts well with the first few bars of “The Good Life.” Then nothing much happens. This exercise is repeated throughout. Each song starts promisingly, but GP! (The artist formerly known as Guðmundur Pétursson) is just too pop and not avant-garde enough for a whole album of instrumentals. Pop music needs its choruses, and a guest singer or two (come on, GP!, we know you have them on your speed-dial) would have been most welcome. Meanwhile, GP! had best not give up his day-job as plain old Guðmundur Pétursson.


Culture
Album review
Rökrétt Framhald

Rökrétt Framhald

by

On Grísalappalísa’s debut album ‘Ali’, there’s a line in “Lóan er komin” where singer Baldur Baldursson growls, “Thoroughly thought out/Much

Culture
Album review
Unortheta

Unortheta

by

‘Unortheta’ is a forty-minute frisson full of looming doom, blasting fury, and cavernous bellows that seem to emanate from the

Culture
Album review
Í Sporum Annara

Í Sporum Annara

by

Logn come screaming through the gates with a vicious noise attack egged on by a pair of voices battling to

Culture
Album review
Rivers & Poems

Rivers & Poems

by

A collaboration between Frosti Jónsson and Japanese ambient drone artist Nobuto Suda, this four-and-a-half track suite falls deeply into the

Culture
Album review
I Got A Feeling

I Got A Feeling

by

The opening track “Like A Bird” is well-named because it really does resemble the output of Mr. Oizo of Flat

Culture
Album review
Apeshedder

Apeshedder

by

Glitchy synths, ambient interludes, and dreamscape pop: that’s ‘Apeshedder’ in a nutshell. What that doesn’t tell us about, of course, is the shimmering flourishes with

Show Me More!