Music
Review
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Jeff Who?

Published January 12, 2009

Quite confidently, Jeff Who? published their sophomore album
self-titled. Again, it provides everything the band got famous for with
the debut “Death before Disco”. There are tons of catchy hooklines and
pleasant melodies. Disco seldom seems as alive, especially when it
comes to the use of synthesizers and backing vocal arrangements. Jeff
Who? manage an exciting balancing act between modern Brit-pop bands
like Franz Ferdinand, poppier Queen and 80s disco-rock in the vein of
Bonnie Tyler. That sounds cheesy and here is the bad news: it sometimes
is. When the backing choir beeps “She’s got the touch” in the song of
the same name, that is really too much of the disco. However, the band
successfully serves very good songs like “Alain” or the rocking “You
and Me”. This is how “Jeff Who?” remains a good album in the end; you
just have to some of the tracks.


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