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Review
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Track Of The Issue: Just Another Snake Cult: Birds Carried Your Song Through The Night

Published June 15, 2012

A swell little solo EP from Just Another Snake Cult. Short, sweet and kaleidoscopic, ‘Birds Carried Your Song Though The Night’ has a distinctly retro feel to it, with synthesizers echoing throughout like ghosts from the past. There is a dream-like, instrumental quality to the album, and although though most tracks have lyrics, the resonating sharpness of the synths and singer/band leader Þórir Bogason’s mumbled way of singing combine to undercut them, almost to the point where they are not necessary. Even if you like music with ‘depth’ or whatever, this album can still appeal on the basis of this dreamy, midnight quality.
All up, an enjoyable EP. It has just enough of the old to satisfy my inner ’80s child and enough of its own style to not be derivative.
Download it here.


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