Will These Eurovision Predictions Hold Up?

Words by

Published May 26, 2012

Twenty six countries will compete in the Grand Final of the 2012 Eurovision Song Contest tonight. Will predictions that we made a week ago hold up tonight? The Netherlands won’t be placing third, but Sweden, Russia, Greece, and Ireland are still in the running. Or will Iceland definitely win it all?
Bergrún Anna Hallsteinsdóttir:

1. Sweden: I have long been a sucker for cheesy, anthemic trance music. Harkens back to my raving days, dancing under the stars in the New Zealand wilderness.
2. Russia: Um, need I explain? Dancing Grandmas with bad teeth. Anything that makes me laugh out loud goes at least in the top ten.
3. Netherlands: A song with instruments and fully clothed, non-gyrating women playing them, something different indeed! 
And finally, my prediction for Iceland in this year’s Eurovision… I am thinking, just, you know, without much real insight or knowledge, that Iceland will get tenth place. Just because, that’s why.
Sindri Eldon:
As Eurovision is mostly about futile, vapid political gestures of solidarity and friendship between nations whose diplomatic relations need bolstering for one reason or another, I feel I can safely say that the winner will be the result of a collection of sympathy votes.
Greece and Ireland have both suffered tremendous financial woes of late, mostly due to corruption and incompetency running rampant in their respective governments. Yet, they have managed to maintain a rather ‘victimized’ image, while Iceland’s troubles have painted an image of its people as being greedy, short-sighted and unwilling to shoulder blame. For these reasons, I feel that Greece and/or Ireland will place in the top three. Russia is a likely contender for the top three as well, with its combination of political power, nuclear weapons, and the novelty of picking a group of old Otyak women yelling over a house beat for this year’s number.
Meanwhile Iceland, having once again picked a tepid and forgettable turd of a song even by Eurovision’s standards, and having failed to make any real friends on Europe’s political stage, will, as usual, trail somewhere in the 15-25 range.



Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

Straumur: Best Of Music

by and

Best album: GusGus’s ‘Mexico’ The greats of Icelandic dance music, GusGus, have yet to slip up in their almost two decade long career and they certainly don’t do so on their latest album, ‘Mexico.’ They continue to explore the sonic terrain of their last album, ‘Arabian Horse,’ a sound that is not in any way minimal, but extremely economical. But that would be for nothing if it weren’t for the melodies and singers. Vocalist Daníel Ágúst has particularly outstanding performances in “Crossfade” and “Sustain” and former member Urður Hákonardóttir shines on standout track, “Another Life.” But they also hark back

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

The Northern Edge Of The Scene

by

If you were to read about Icelandic music in the press, then you’d be forgiven for thinking that all we listen to up here all day is a continuous loop of FM Belfast, Ásgeir, and Sigúr Rós, while employing secret cloning technology to keep our cultural industries stuffed full of post-rock non-entities and ethereal pop ninnies that sport woollen ponchos, face paint, and feather headdresses. Frankly that sort of stuff would send a sane person round the bend. Oh, but reader there are much wilder sounds on this Island if you know where to look! From black metal, to feminist

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

Weather Or Not

by

Red sands, yoga, seal-watching, camp games and nightly concerts in a barn—the only thing the organisers of Rauðasandur Festival couldn’t promise was good weather. The festival, held during the first weekend of July at a remote farm in the West Fjords, is ambitious in its design: 500 eager festival-goers and musicians abandon modern comforts for a four-day marathon of concerts, camping, coordinated activities, and revelry in an idyllic location reachable only by a treacherous, winding dirt road. Icelandic weather being unpredictable as it is, however, the festival organisers are used to changing plans by now. After four iterations—the first of

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of Issue: Grísalappalísa’s “Nýlendugata-Pálsbæjarvör-Grótta”

by

This frantic and irreverent song is the band’s very first single off of their new album, ‘Rökrétt Framhald’ (“Logical Progression”). The lyrics focus on a person sneaking out of their home and going on a wild ride through Reykjavík, and in typical Grísalappalísa style, also highlight the banality of life in the city. The chorus in particular drives the point home that nothing is new under the sun, counting up the things the protagonist sees, such as grey skies, empty streets and neon lights, before ending with “et cetera.” The instrumentals further accentuate the contrast between the band’s two singers;

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

ATP Iceland Portrait Series By Matthew Eisman

by

I wanted to try something different and challenging at ATP Iceland 2014 so I decided to shoot a series of backstage band portraits. I set up a portrait studio on-location at Atlantic Studios and shot as many bands as possible. For some artists I had less than a minute to work with. For others, time was flexible and we tried a few different looks. I didn’t get everyone, and there are a couple big names noticeably absent here. But I’m happy with the results and hope you enjoy too! Huge thanks to all the artists that participated, and to Tómas

Show Me More!