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Come All Ye Faithful, But Other People Can Totally Come If They Want To

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Published April 21, 2011

Not all artists are assholes. Some, in fact, can be quite friendly. While the Hallgrímskirkja Friends Of The Arts Society may not befriend artists, they are, as their name suggests, great fans of art, so an appreciation of artists would be implied; indeed, it would kind of be necessary, considering what it is the Friends Of The Arts do. They promote art exhibitions and concerts in Reykjavík’s iconic Hallgrímskirkja church, that pointy edifice that looms over the centre of town like some crazed monolithic seal.
This month, the Friends Of The Arts have organised some kick-ass classical music for us, including a free organ concert, some chamber music although most notable is a celebration of Iceland’s most notorious composer of hymns (and the man who gave Hallgrímskirkja its name), Hallgrímur Pétursson. His hymnody, the ‘Passion Hymns,’ will be read in its 50-psalm entirety on Good Friday, and there will also be a performance of select hymns on Maundy Thursday.
For anyone interested in Icelandic religious culture, as well as just Icelandic culture in general, the Friends Of The Arts are well worth investigating in.
13:00 -19:00 Hallgrímur Péturssons’s Passion Hymns. Complete readings of the 17th century poetic texts by Icelandic priest
and poet, Hallgrímur Pétursson. Co-ordination: Baldur Sigurðsson (Free).
23:00 Hymns by Hallgrimur Pétursson performed by Kristín Erna Blöndal soprano, Gunnar Gunnarsson organ and Matthías Hemstock percussion (2000 ISK).
More information: listvinafelag.is
When: April 22, 13:00 -19:00, 23:00
Where: Hallgrímskirkja



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