A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again
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Boston

Boston

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Published August 7, 2008

A fresh addition to the Reykjavík bar and bistro scene. Roomy bar floor, nice sofas and stylish interior make this a comfy café as well as a tavern with good, unintrusive music.

Click on image to see bigger map!

  • Address: Laugavegur 28b, 101 Reykjavík
  • Phone: +354 5177816
  • Show on map: click here

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