A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again
Culture
Movies & Theatre
Nazi Zombies at the Movies

Nazi Zombies at the Movies

Published May 11, 2009

Like crossing garlic with blue cheese, it’s hard to see how you can go wrong with two such strong ingredients as Nazis AND zombies, all rolled into one mouth-watering package. And yet, more often than not, you end up feeling unfulfilled with stink in your mouth. So far, the 21st Century has given us three films featuring Nazi undead. No sign yet of a Churchill/Van Helsing team-up, so we have to make due with:
The Bunker by Rob Green (UK, 2001)
Nazi Zombie Factor: Actually quite realistic for a film featuring Nazi Zombies. The plot is fairly plausible, as these things go, and there even is a moral. War is, indeed, hell.
Directed by Rob Green, currently working on a film featuring Romans and werewolves. Of course.
Not, as the name would imply, yet another take on the last days of Hitler. There were plenty of other bunkers in World War II, the suicidal Fuehrer’s not included. Some, however, did include Nazi Zombies, as this film suggests. This is one of few Nazi zombie films from the point of view of the Nazis, though, alas, not from the point of view of the Nazi Zombies. Set at the end of 1944, a group of German soldiers are surrounded by hamburger eating Americans on one side, and the no doubt flesh eating Nazi zombies on the other. They have to choose which enemy is worse. How will it end? Well, we all know who eventually took over the world. Clue: it was not the flesh eating Nazi Zombies.

Outpost by Steve Barker (UK, 2008)
Nazi Zombie Factor: Nazi Zombies as one of Hitler’s wonder weapons is not such a bad idea. It’s their inconsistency that grates. Sometimes they march in formation like good Wehrmacht soldiers, at other times they appear out of nowhere and dig themselves up from the ground, caring little for Nazi tactics. Come on, make up your mind.
The Brits really seem to have a thing for Nazi Zombies. Perhaps they are trying to remind us how things would have been if they had lost the Battle of Britain. Ray Stevenson, best known as Pullo from the Rome series, is here a mercenary somewhere in the Balkans. His group is on a mission to retrieve a MacGuffin from an old German bunker where they run into, you guessed it, Nazi Zombies. Apparently, the Germans’ mad scientists had their own version of the Philadelphia Experiment way back when, leaving some of their henchmen still alive, or rather, undead. An inferior ripoff of The Bunker.

Dead Snow by Tommy Wirkola (NOR, 2009)

Nazi Zombie Factor: Abandoning any attempt to explain their presence via deserting soldiers or wonder weapons, we instead get people using their intestines to mountain climb. This is the Nazi Zombie movie to beat.
Tommy Wirkola, best known for his Kill Bill spoof Kill Buljo, set among Sami reindeer herders in Northern Norway. Of course.
Disgustingly healthy and happy looking young Norwegians on a skiing trip get their comeuppance from the undead. With the charming tagline “Ein, zwei, die!”, Dead snow is everything you want a Nazi Zombie movie to be. Little attempt is made to explain their presence, other than an old Norwegian skier telling of a squad of particularly nasty Nazi bastards in occupied Norway during World War Two. What it lacks in subtlety, it makes up for in chainsaws, axes, Molotov cocktails, machine guns, and yes, even a hammer and sickle. Model Jenny Skavlan, best known from the irritating Grandiosa Pizza commercial, gets pulled down an outdoor latrine to be decapitated when the Nazi Zombies make their entrance. It’s all uphill from there.



Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Remembrance and Re-Remembrance

by

Following the astounding success of their last collaboration, “Dansaðu fyrir mig,” (‘Dance for Me’), collaborators (and fiances) Pétur Ármannsson and Brogan Davison have used their new show “Petra” to reapproach some of the former show’s more fertile topics—artistic creation and family—while also dipping into the more complicated aspects of memory, autobiography, and storytelling. Debuting as part of the Lókal international theater festival, “Petra” is ostensibly a glimpse into the life of Pétur’s great grandmother, Petra Sveinsdóttir, whose semi-obsessive passion for collecting lead her to amass thousands of stones in and around her home in Stöðvarfjörður, East Iceland. (Petra decided to turn her

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Horse Manoeuvre

by

Benedikt Erlingsson’s theatrical debut is a mosaic of several stories that centre on people’s colourful relationships with their horses. The film, ‘Of Horses And Men,’ which came out in late August of last year, has received glowing reviews from critics and it has picked up several awards on the festival circuit, such as the Kutxa-New Directors awards at the San Sebastián Film Festival, and the Best Director Award, at the Tokyo Film Festival. We spoke with Benedikt about his love for storytelling, cinema and horses. Why did you decide to make a film about horses? When you’re starting out in

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

A Hard Metal Life

by

Young Hera, played by Þorbjörg Helga Dýrfjörð, witnesses the accidental death of her older brother, Baldur. In response, she remakes herself in his image; she adopts his metal music, clothes, and when we see her in her 20s, she is a full-blown metalhead. Despite nearly a decade since the tragedy, the death of Baldur continues to loom over her and her family, their lives consumed by grief. Her mother and father have internalised their grief, manifesting itself in silences and coldness to one another. Though Hera hardly talks about it either, her outlet for all that pain is through her

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Cool Off With Cool Cuts

by

In the four years since Bíó Paradís opened, the cinema has become a hub for Icelandic independent films as well as others that would not be shown elsewhere. In 2010, Programme Director Ása Baldursdóttir started ‘Cool Cuts,’ a summer series of Icelandic films with English subtitles. Though certainly a boon for tourists interested in Icelandic cinema, she also believes it is an important addition to Reykjavík’s cultural landscape. What was the idea behind creating Cool Cuts? Our idea was to strengthen the visibility of Icelandic filmmaking to English speakers with the best Icelandic films. We think it’s a great addition

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Real ‘Life In A fishbowl’

by

‘Life In A Fishbowl’ tells three distinct stories of people living in pre-crisis Iceland. It stars Hera Hilmarsdóttir as Eik, a down on her luck kindergarten teacher who struggles to support her daughter; Þorsteinn Bachmann as Móri, a troubled writer; and Þorvaldur Davíð as Sölvi, an ex-footballer on the fast-track working for a bank doing some shady business. Director Baldvin Z teamed up with writer/musician Birgir Örn (of the band Maus) to write the screenplay for ‘Vonarstræti’ (‘Life In A Fishbowl’). It’s a follow up to his debut feature ‘Jitters’ (2010). Even though Baldvin has directed commercials, two feature films

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Uh, No

by

Man, fuck Darren Aronofsky. Fuck his weak, hacky, hammy, pretentious, melodramatic, student-filmmaking-with-a-budget shit. I’ve always been mystified as to how it is he gets people to buy his overdone soap opera crap as serious film, but I’m confident ‘Noah’–a retelling of the renowned Biblical yarn with all the animals on the boat, shot largely in Iceland–will finally be his undoing; it will expose his shoddily constructed ‘films’ for what they are: overwrought and overrated pandering to fad-driven art-house wannabes who are too impatient for genuine counterculture film, but too proud to admit they’d rather be watching a Michael Bay movie. 

Show Me More!