A Grapevine service announcement Be patient: That eruption is expected to last until 2015
Culture
Movies & Theatre
Nazi Zombies at the Movies

Nazi Zombies at the Movies

Published May 11, 2009

Like crossing garlic with blue cheese, it’s hard to see how you can go wrong with two such strong ingredients as Nazis AND zombies, all rolled into one mouth-watering package. And yet, more often than not, you end up feeling unfulfilled with stink in your mouth. So far, the 21st Century has given us three films featuring Nazi undead. No sign yet of a Churchill/Van Helsing team-up, so we have to make due with:
The Bunker by Rob Green (UK, 2001)
Nazi Zombie Factor: Actually quite realistic for a film featuring Nazi Zombies. The plot is fairly plausible, as these things go, and there even is a moral. War is, indeed, hell.
Directed by Rob Green, currently working on a film featuring Romans and werewolves. Of course.
Not, as the name would imply, yet another take on the last days of Hitler. There were plenty of other bunkers in World War II, the suicidal Fuehrer’s not included. Some, however, did include Nazi Zombies, as this film suggests. This is one of few Nazi zombie films from the point of view of the Nazis, though, alas, not from the point of view of the Nazi Zombies. Set at the end of 1944, a group of German soldiers are surrounded by hamburger eating Americans on one side, and the no doubt flesh eating Nazi zombies on the other. They have to choose which enemy is worse. How will it end? Well, we all know who eventually took over the world. Clue: it was not the flesh eating Nazi Zombies.

Outpost by Steve Barker (UK, 2008)
Nazi Zombie Factor: Nazi Zombies as one of Hitler’s wonder weapons is not such a bad idea. It’s their inconsistency that grates. Sometimes they march in formation like good Wehrmacht soldiers, at other times they appear out of nowhere and dig themselves up from the ground, caring little for Nazi tactics. Come on, make up your mind.
The Brits really seem to have a thing for Nazi Zombies. Perhaps they are trying to remind us how things would have been if they had lost the Battle of Britain. Ray Stevenson, best known as Pullo from the Rome series, is here a mercenary somewhere in the Balkans. His group is on a mission to retrieve a MacGuffin from an old German bunker where they run into, you guessed it, Nazi Zombies. Apparently, the Germans’ mad scientists had their own version of the Philadelphia Experiment way back when, leaving some of their henchmen still alive, or rather, undead. An inferior ripoff of The Bunker.

Dead Snow by Tommy Wirkola (NOR, 2009)

Nazi Zombie Factor: Abandoning any attempt to explain their presence via deserting soldiers or wonder weapons, we instead get people using their intestines to mountain climb. This is the Nazi Zombie movie to beat.
Tommy Wirkola, best known for his Kill Bill spoof Kill Buljo, set among Sami reindeer herders in Northern Norway. Of course.
Disgustingly healthy and happy looking young Norwegians on a skiing trip get their comeuppance from the undead. With the charming tagline “Ein, zwei, die!”, Dead snow is everything you want a Nazi Zombie movie to be. Little attempt is made to explain their presence, other than an old Norwegian skier telling of a squad of particularly nasty Nazi bastards in occupied Norway during World War Two. What it lacks in subtlety, it makes up for in chainsaws, axes, Molotov cocktails, machine guns, and yes, even a hammer and sickle. Model Jenny Skavlan, best known from the irritating Grandiosa Pizza commercial, gets pulled down an outdoor latrine to be decapitated when the Nazi Zombies make their entrance. It’s all uphill from there.



Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

On Thick Ice With Kitty Von-Sometime

by

Artist Kitty Von-Sometime and a crew, including a friend brought along to monitor Kitty’s temperature in the cold, watched uncomfortably as their trailer full of film equipment, an ice sculpture, soda, and other potentially hazardous refreshments bounced in and out of sight in the rearview window as they approached Langjökull glacier. They were on their way to shoot ‘Opus,’ more than a year after Kitty produced her last installment of the Weird Girls Project. Originally conceived to encourage her female friends to push their boundaries, The Weird Girls Project began as a one-time event: the participants showed up with costumes

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

RIFF 2014: Critic’s Picks

by

‘Art and Craft’ dirs. Sam Cullman, Jennifer Grausman and Mark Becker Mark Landis, one of the more prolific art forgers in American history, shopped for arts and crafts supplies at Hobby Lobby; painted, stained and varnished over photocopies from auction catalogues; and donated copies of the same works to multiple museums. While observing the ease with which the suggestion of largesse will open art-world doors, the film is less a meditation on creativity and originality than a sympathetic character portrait. Landis, a diagnosed schizophrenic often seen hunching over TV dinners in front of reruns, with few anchors in the world

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Meet The Directors!

by

The Reykjavík International Film Festival (en.riff.is) runs through October 5, at Bíó Paradís, Háskólabíó, and elsewhere. The program encompasses features, documentaries, and short films by more than 100 directors–a handful of whom generously answered our questionnaire prior to bringing their films to Iceland. Heike Fink – ‘Home in the Ice’ This documentary tells the stories of German women who, during the lean years after WWII, responded to newspaper ads soliciting women to come work on Icelandic farms. Is there any specific aspect of the film you’re especially looking forward to sharing with an Icelandic audience? It was very interesting seeing the

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

The American Indie Filmmaker’s Guide to Iceland

by

The old man is describing how impressed he was with Geyser. “A cum shot to the sky,” he says, in his throaty good-old-boy accent. “Like the Devil’s exploding.” In ‘Land Ho!’, which opens the eleventh annual Reykjavík International Film Festival on September 25, Iceland is the backdrop for unlikely couplings. The film is codirected by Martha Stephens and Aaron Katz, two American filmmakers known for ambling, engaging indies featuring plenty of regional specificity, low-key drama, and off-kilter performers. In the film, ex-brothers-in-law Mitch (Earl Lynn Nelson, the above-quoted) and Colin (Paul Eenhorn) take a trip to Iceland to “get their

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Who is Alice Olivia Clarke?

by

Aside from the leads, most of the actors in ‘Land Ho!’  are either Icelanders in service jobs, or people associated with the production. Alice Olivia Clarke, who appears in a crucial late scene, is neither. Canadian-born, Alice Olivia has lived in Iceland for over 20 years, and in addition to acting (you maybe saw her in Dagur Kári’s ‘The Good Heart’, she works in Hafnarfjörður as a mosaic artist and designer. We discussed her experience with the film over email. You play a visitor to Iceland. How was it getting into that mindset? Did you think about Iceland in a

Culture
Movies & Theatre
<?php the_title(); ?>

Capturing Biophilia

by

Way back in June 2011, English film editor Nick Fenton was one of the lucky few sitting in the crowd at the Manchester International Festival waiting to experience the live premiere of Björk’s epic Biophilia project. David Attenborough’s voice came over the speakers, the screens lit up, and the lights went down, and for the first time an audience was transported into the magical world of Biophilia: from the young and excited girl-choir to the specially constructed stage and dramatic new instruments, the dizzying array of nature footage, the firing Tesla coil and, of course, the grand dame herself, bobbing

Show Me More!