Culture
Books
Dungeon (The Series)

Dungeon (The Series)

Published October 27, 2009

French humour has sometimes been described as “not funny” or “weird”. Lewis Trondheim is both French and funny. He’s so prolific as a cartoonist that it’s tempting to think he runs a sweatshop with tubby little illustrators that are fed with croissants and coffee and can only go to the bathroom twice a day. Instead of doing that, he has ganged up with fine artists and writers such as Joann Sfar and Kerascoet. Together they are like a team of ninjas with pens. Trondheim and friends have even threatened to do at least 300 Dungeon books.
The Dungeon series master the fine art of being dark and silly at the same time. The world of Dungeon is full of dragons and birds, sorcery and weapons. It’s a parody of the fantasy worlds similar to Dungeons and Dragons, without being too nerdy or inaccessible to those who are unfamiliar with D&D. The timeline of the series as a whole is a bit complicated at first. Dungeon is divided into 3 main series: Early Years, Zenith and Twilight and in-between are sub-series and all sorts of nonsense. The series tell the story of the creation, glory days and eventually the demise of the Dungeon world. It seems difficult to sort everything out, but the books are so well written and illustrated that eventually you won’t care about timelines—unless you are anal-retentive—which won’t be a problem either because information about the timelines is plentiful.
There is nothing less disappointing than Dungeon, except maybe other books by Lewis Trondheim.

  • Created by: Lewis Trondheim & Joann Sfar
  • Art by: Kerascoet et al.


Culture
Books
Weird Icelandic Spirits Revealed

Weird Icelandic Spirits Revealed

by

If you’re interested in “Icelandic stuff” (which let’s face it, you probably are if you’re on this website – thanks for that, by the way, we love you) you may have caught a glimpse of Arngrimur Sigurðsson’s Duldýrasafnið project on social media recently. Because with the help of plenty of well-targeted sponsored posts on Facebook, his vivid (re)imaginings of mythical Icelandic creatures from the mists of history have gone a little viral. Not like Ebola-viral or anything, but definitely like a catchy cold that “goes around.” Utlising the Karolina project funding website, a campaign to raise funds for a book

Culture
Books
Butterflies In November

Butterflies In November

by

If it’s possible to claim a ‘trend’ based on what is as yet a rather small sample size, an interesting one seems to be developing in the domain of Icelandic literature in English translation. Until recently, these translations basically occupied either side of the ‘high’ literature/genre fiction spectrum—basically, Halldór Laxness and Sjón on one end and Arnaldur Indriðason and Yrsa Sigurdardóttir on the other. But the last five years have seen the area in the middle fill in a bit more, introducing English translations of absurdist quasi-sci-fi novels (Andri Snær Magnason’s ‘LoveStar’), novels dealing with Iceland’s transition from rural to

Culture
Books
Silent No More

Silent No More

by

Gerður Krístný is an immensely prolific writer, having produced some 18 books—including poetry and short story collections, novels for adults and children, a biography and a travel narrative—since her first publication in 1994. However, she is as of yet relatively unknown to English-reading audiences. For although several international collections have anthologised her poems and short stories, it was not until Gerður won the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2010 that one of her works, the winning poetry book ‘Bloodhoof,’ was translated into English in its entirety. “I feel as though I have been writing ‘Bloodhoof’ since I was a child,” Gerður has

Culture
Books
A False Version Of The Truth

A False Version Of The Truth

by

When we meet Einar, a seasoned Reykjavík crime reporter, at the opening of Árni Þórarinsson’s ‘Season of the Witch,’ he—much like the country around him—is in the midst of great change, and he’s not terribly happy about it. It’s the early 2000s, Iceland’s pre-crash boom years, and given the choice of “the whiskey or the work,” Einar begrudgingly accepts banishment to the paper’s new Akureyri headquarters in North Iceland, where industrial growth has begun to drastically alter the texture of village life. But while Einar can’t escape the more banal aspects of provincial journalism—such as ask-a-local “Question of the Day”

Culture
Books
Monster or Martyr

Monster or Martyr

by

Based on the real story of Agnes Magnúsdóttir, who in 1830 became the last person to be executed for a crime in Iceland, ‘Burial Rites,’ the debut novel by Australian author Hannah Kent, is the culmination of ten years’ of writing, research, and obsession-what the 26-year-old winner of the Writing Australia Unpublished Manuscript Award describes as her “dark love letter to Iceland.” Lyrically written, meticulously researched and swiftly plotted, `Burial Rites’ takes an infamous figure in Icelandic history and transforms her from “the spider, the witch caught in the webbing of her own fateful weaving,” into a believably complex character

Culture
Books
The Friendliest Little Crime Fest In Reykjavík

The Friendliest Little Crime Fest In Reykjavík

by

Going into its first year, Iceland Noir, the first ever Icelandic literary festival dedicated exclusively to crime fiction, has already set a high bar: months prior to the event it attracted over one hundred and twenty registered participants, many of whom will be travelling to Iceland from abroad to attend. Arnaldur Indriðason will be the Guest of Honour, and among the panel participants are a number of much loved and lauded authors such as Ann Cleeves, whose Vera Stanhope novels have been adapted into a popular BBC TV show; John Curran, a leading expert on the life and writing of

Show Me More!