Culture
Food
Wings Of Love

Wings Of Love

Published July 25, 2012

Úrilla Górillan (“The Grumpy Gorilla”) is a bar with two locations, specialising in small groups, American grub, too much beer and finding an outlet for our inner cannibal necrophiliacs through the ritualised watching of organised sports.
After proving reasonably successful with their American sports bar at their Stórhöfði 17 location, The Gorilla decided to swing over to 101 Reykjavík a couple of months back. The Gorilla planted itself right next to The English Pub, sure to provide a stream of lively conversations through a cloud of halftime cigarettes in the outside common area about what exactly constitutes “football.”
Downstairs there are more monitors than you can throw a disapproving banana at. There are monitors inside monitors and those monitors have tiny iPhones of their own broadcasting a live stream of a stack of monitors in a post-apocalyptic future where monitors have conquered the human race (next Thursday?). The upstairs area is mostly rented out to college kids or small business groups and I have been told it will eventually be fitted with retro arcade games and a 3D projector.
So what’s the food like? The Gorilla has the standard burgers, fries and wings fare. Having said that, this is probably the best sports bar food I’ve had in Iceland. My male escort for the evening had the burrito with large oat flakes (1,990 ISK dinner / 990 ISK lunch) and I had the peppercorn cheeseburger (1,990 ISK dinner / 990 ISK lunch) and we split a large side order of hot wings (1,790 ISK).
The burger was surprisingly good: juicy without dripping with grease, fresh bun, medium rare and tasted of green peppercorns. The burrito was less exciting; they should focus on the grease and leave out the “healthy” additions. To liven it up, my male escort make the mistake of adding a pint of habanero Tabasco and I had to listen to his whimpering for the rest of the meal.
The star of the show were the wings, although wings in name only, seeing as what you get are thin deep-fried chicken fillets with a breadcrumb coating served with a lacing of hot sauce and a side of mild blue cheese sauce. But those faux wings still managed to soar above any wings I’ve had in Iceland up to now—custom-made breadcrumbs and tender, juicy fillets.
Top marks for the service as well. A small mistake was made with the burger order but they whipped up the right order in what seemed like five minutes and they split the order of wings without us asking.
My main complaint is that Úrilla Górillan needs to get a proper website. They might think it’s rad to rely on social media for the heavy lifting (how Web two-point-whoah! of them), but a barebones Facebook page with no menu is like handing out business cards while not wearing any pants (which might actually work if you’re a bar-hopping gorilla). Get some college kid to do it for you in exchange for some free beers.

Úrilla Górillan
Austurstræti 12, 101 Reykjavík

What We Think: Good burgers, great hot “wings”
Flavour: American sports bar by the numbers
Ambiance: Gets louder as the night goes on but not as fratty as the other sports bars
Service: Fast and friendly
Rating: 4/5



Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

Great Grandma’s Recipe, With a Kick

by

Sceptics of Jungian psychology take note: the collective unconscious is most certainly A Thing here in Iceland. How’s that, you wonder? There are lots of good examples, such as the quickly passé, but briefly passionate fad for Tex-Mex-themed confirmation parties. But more to the point, consider the emergence of Reykjavík’s food truck culture. Less than six months ago, it didn’t really exist in Iceland. And then, practically overnight, a handful of carts suddenly blossomed around town, with two of them selling kjötsúpa, or Icelandic meat soup, as their premier item. Having opened in May (slightly beforeits kjötsúpa-serving cousinSúpuvagninn), Farmer’s Soup

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

ATTN! Brennivín Models Wanted!

by

Iceland’s signature spirit needs you! They’re looking for six models, aspiring models, or people who just like to have their picture taken, ages 18-35, for a photo shoot at a downtown Reykjavik bar, this coming Monday July 7. In return, you will get a Brennivín t-shirt, lunch and a beer….and you’ll be featured on the Brennivin.com website. You can send a pic and a little about yourself to: info@brennivinamerica.com    

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

In A World Of Coffee, Where Is Iceland?

by

This month, the World of Coffee, one of the leading events in the speciality coffee industry, took place in Rimini, Italy. Coffee professionals from around the world came to represent their home countries in a variety of competitions, including the coveted World Barista Championship. However, for the first time since the championships were established 14 years ago, Iceland failed to send any competitors. Given that there’s certainly no shortage of coffee shops in downtown Reykjavík, this begs the questions: what went wrong and need Icelanders be concerned about the quality of the coffee they’re guzzling down? Coffee is undoubtedly deeply

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

Street Food, Family-Style

by

Less than two weeks old, Súpuvagninn (“The Soup Wagon”) is Reykjavík’s newest food truck, focusing (almost) exclusively on kjötsúpa (“meat soup”), what food historian Nanna Rögnvaldardóttir has called “the national soup of Iceland.” Owned and managed by brothers Gabríel Þór and Benjamín Ágúst, staffed by their sister, and located, for good measure, in Mæðragarður (“Mothers’ Garden”), Súpuvagninn’s family approach to street cuisine gives Icelanders and tourists alike a taste of amma’s (“grandma’s”) home cooking on the go. On the first afternoon my companion and I arrived at the white wagon, its sides cheerfully decorated with grinning carrots and other anthropomorphised

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

Kigali Needs Fine-Tuning

by

Kigali is a recently opened café named after the capital and largest city of the war-ridden African country of Rwanda. It serves all the conventional westernized versions of Italian Coffee, the only difference being that their Americano is called an “Africano.” A small number of sweets are on offer to enjoy with your coffee, served in bite-size pieces that are easy to take along with the take-away coffee. In addition to serving coffee and sweets, a small variety of African dishes are on offer as well as a changing soup of the day. “African dishes” is of course pretty vague,

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

Eimverk’s Whisky Matures, Its Gin Blossoms

by

The first thing I notice as I slip through the warehouse’s unmarked door is the smell: somewhere between the sweetness of freshly-baked bread and the earthiness of a turf fire. The space is given over to several large tanks, all of which are adorned with a confusion of pipes, gauges and valves. Against the back wall, barrels and bottles of Flóki Whisky and Vor Gin await distribution. I have come to meet the brothers Þorkelsson who, along with three other family members, run Eimverk Distillery–producers of Iceland’s first-ever single-malt. Having read that they only had the idea to make whisky

Show Me More!