Culture
Food
Meet Iceland’s Award-Winning  Raw Food Chef

Meet Iceland’s Award-Winning Raw Food Chef

Published May 4, 2012

Sólveig Eiríksdóttir, better known as Solla, was recently voted “Favourite Raw Gourmet Chef” and “Favourite Raw Simple Chef” in the annual Best of Raw contest, which accepts nominations and votes through their website bestofrawfoods.com. We got Solla to tell us a little bit about the Raw Food movement in Iceland and the key to her success—which is certainly not a top-secret book of recipes because she happily shares her favourite recipe for all of you to enjoy…
When did the Raw Food concept take off in Iceland? And how did you get into it?
In 1950, the first Raw book, ‘Lifandi Fæða,’ by Kristine Nolfi, a Danish MD who cured herself of cancer, was published in Reykjavík. Kristine’s book sold out, and she came to Reykjavík to give a lecture. But, interest more or less faded by the seventies.I changed my diet in 1980 when I learned about Macrobiotic and started to eat their way. I first heard about Raw Food from a friend in 1996. It sounded interesting so I took the next flight to Puerto Rico to learn more. I loved the food and its influence on my body and I went raw over night.
At that time, there were no active people here. Little by little, however, people have become more interested in the movement. I encouraged people to go to Puerto Rico to check it out, and I started to offer a lot of food prep classes. By 2004, I think it has been a fast growing movement.
Was your restaurant Gló an instant success?
My husband and I took over Gló in January 2010, and it was an instant success. Not only is it a growing trend, but also a number of people like to eat at least partially Raw. They see it as a healthy way to turn raw veggies into a meal.
What separates you from others in the Raw Food business? Your SECRET?
I think that my strength is that I work in the kitchen at Gló every day, starting early morning. So I get a lot of practise and I have to be constantly thinking of new ideas to keep my customers happy.  Well, if I have a secret, it is probably that I go to Los Angeles twice a year to meet with all of the wonderful Raw trendsetters. I give a food demo there in front of thousands of people and each time I have to present something new so I have to stay imaginative and creative.
Will you share your favourite recipe with us?

I love Kelp noodles and this recipe is very popular at Gló:
Thai Style Kelp Noodles ♥
1    bag Kelp Noodles
1    green zucchini, made into noodles with a spiral slicer
1/2    cup green cabbage, 1/2 cup red cabbage, very thinly sliced
1/2    cup green onions, thinly sliced
1/3    bunch of each: fresh basil, cilantro, mint
The sauce:
1 1/2    cup thick homemade almondmilk
1/2    cup sesame oil
2    Tbsp of each:fresh basil, cilantro, mint
4    lime leaves
1    stalk lemon grass
1-2    clove garlic, minced
1-2    Tbsp peeled, grated ginger
2    Tbsp lemon or lime juice
2    Tbsp lime zest, grated
1-2    Tbsp agave syrup or other sweetener
1    Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1    tsp Himalayan crystal salt
1/2    tsp cayenne pepper, optional
Toppings:
Wild jungle peanuts, chopped, avocado in cubes, pineapple in bite size
pieces, 1 tsp of each chopped herbs: cilantro, mint, basil, 1 Tbsp dulse.
Instructions:
Soak and rinse the kelp noodles in fresh water, strain, pat dry and place them into a beautiful bowl. Using a spiral slicer, peel the zucchini down to the core of seeds on all sides, forming “spaghetti” and place these noodles into the bowl with the kelp noodles. Cut the green and red cabbage very thinly and add to the bowl. Finely mince the fresh herbs and place 1/3 bunch of each. For the sauce: Put everything into a blender and blend until smooth.
Toss the noodles with the sauce and sprinkle with the toppings. Enjoy!  



Culture
Food
Icelandic Whisky — A Taste Of Things To Come

Icelandic Whisky — A Taste Of Things To Come

by

The small and unassuming Eimverk distillery can be found in an industrial park in Garðabær. Inside, numerous vats, barrels, boxes, filters and pieces of distillery equipment flood the warehouse floor space, and there is a notably sour (but not pungent) smell in the air. The family-run distillery has already received critical acclaim for their gin, Vor, which got a Double Gold Award at the 2014 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. That’s impressive, but we’re not here to praise their gin, we’re here to taste their whisky, which is the first of its kind to be made in Iceland. Water of

Culture
Food
Orable Tradition

Orable Tradition

by

Nostalgia marketing is big money but it is around the Holidays that it is most expertly wielded. Shady mega-conglomerates and unashamed monopolies doff their Christmas caps and electrocute their army of Yuletide lab monkeys into screeching Christmas carols. But it wasn’t until the 1950s that companies found a way to market the Christmas celebrations and binge consumption to the middle and lower classes. And ever since the 50s, for one month out of the year, our corporate overlords transport us all to the 1880s. But this time around, instead of typhoid, we get cursive fonts, sepia filters and snapshots of

Culture
Food
DESCENDING INTO FOOD-A-GEDDON

DESCENDING INTO FOOD-A-GEDDON

by

The children were nestled all snug in their beds, while visions of sugarplums danced in their heads. And their teeny-tiny bellies rumbled all fill’d with seven kinds of animals kill’d and smoked, salted, cured, canned, hung, dried, buried, beaten, signed, sealed, delivered, it’s yours. Welcome to the food-a-geddon. Leave your gag reflex at the door and let the gavage begin! The Yule Lads For children, Christmas starts on December 12, when the first of the thirteen Yule Lads comes crawling through their window bearing the gifts of knick-knacks and terror sweat. In many cases those gifts are candies. No one

Culture
Food
Have Yourself A Sexy Little Christmas

Have Yourself A Sexy Little Christmas

by

Chocolate. Oh heavenly Chocolate! The Aztecs—early converts to the cause—believed that it was a gift from the gods, and that it could even bestow special powers upon those who consumed it. We can confirm that this is true. We learned it at Halldór Kr. Sigurðsson’s chocolate making course. We also learned to make chocolate. It was sexy. On a rainy afternoon, a group of dedicated people is immersed in the steamy act of melting chocolate. Learning how to heat, stir and harden chocolate; how best to bathe marzipan in it, and how to sprinkle the pieces of chocolate covered marzipan

Culture
Food
What Icelanders Eat For The Holidays

What Icelanders Eat For The Holidays

by

Look, intrepid traveller! Here is a primer on the usual suspects and new additions to the ever-popular Icelandic Christmas buffets, found at various restaurants around the country. If you’re around in time for one of those, why not give it a whirl? You’ll certainly be immersing yourself in Icelandic culture, if nothing else. The Kings of Meat Town Hangikjöt should be the first word in any discussion of Icelandic holiday culinary traditions. A common misconception is that Hangikjöt can only be made from lamb, but the name only refers to the processing method of the meat as it literally translates

Culture
Food
All You Need Is Love. And Icelandic Gourmet Chocolate

All You Need Is Love. And Icelandic Gourmet Chocolate

by

Imagine an abandoned gas station office. A few things might spring to mind. An empty room with peeling walls, seen only by kids who’ve snuck in to smoke a joint. A dark, dusty old shack you could set a horror movie in. Of the various mental images the phrase “abandoned gas station office” might conjure, “small chocolate factory” surely isn’t one. But, reality is often stranger than fiction, and out on the Seltjarnarnes peninsula, a small chocolate factory inside an abandoned gas station office is exactly what you’ll find. Behind a pair of now-automated pink petrol pumps, the windows of

Show Me More!