A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Holuhraun, still spewing lava. Bárðarbunga, still sinking.
Culture
Art
Fashion Inspired By Art Brut And ’60s New Wave Films

Fashion Inspired By Art Brut And ’60s New Wave Films

Published July 5, 2012

Sævar Markús Óskarsson’s first line, a small collection of silk accessories inspired by Romanian folklore, sold out in a fortnight. Now he’s getting ready to debut his men’s and women’s wear collections this fall, which feature androgynously tailored pieces mixed with silk dresses for women and printed shirts with detailed patterns for men. We met the fashion designer at his studio on Laugavegur to find out more about this work and how his background as an artist shapes his designs.
You studied art before going into fashion?
Yes, I originally studied art and art history. However, I became interested in fashion when I went to Paris to work with a group of visual artists. They were doing a lot of multimedia art and some performances, and I was making costumes. It was really through collaboration with the fashion house Agnés B, when I was working in their space and going through their fabric collection, that I really decided to go into fashion.

Does your background in art come into play when you’re designing?

It does, as my field of interest is so broad. I really enjoy researching and finding inspiration from a wide variety of sources, such as literature, antiques, art or films. I like grabbing bits from here and there, like a moment in a film, just a few seconds, that makes you go, ‘Wow, that’s something.’ In the end all this research comes together in a big database that I can then work from.
Did something in particular inspire your new fall/winter collection?
I was inspired by Art Brut, where artists that may not be traditionally educated often work from a naïve perspective. I was also deeply inspired by Czech and British new wave films from the ’60s.
The cut of the garments is mostly androgynous; the classic tailored pieces are sized to fit both sexes. Some things, like the dresses and ladies shirts, are extremely feminine though and are made from feminine fabric like chiffon. One dress in particular is dedicated to the singer of Broadcast, Trish Keenan, whom I’ve always felt a strong connection to.
How would you describe your design, is there a singular concept?
I would say it’s very classical, at least the cut. I like classical tailoring and want garments to be well made and cut. This collection was mostly inspired by art, but next summer I will be working with florals and Finland for example. It’s mainly classic looks, but is heavily infused with what I’m inspired by at that moment.
What’s it like to start your brand in Iceland?
The market is small and it is a lot of work. It’s expensive to import fabrics and you can, at most, hire a seamstress to help out when it’s really busy. You have a lot on your plate at any given time. But I’m just starting out, so all the work is on me at the moment. However the good thing about working here is that you can try things out, taking one step at a time. And in the end, you never know what’s going to happen!



Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Pop Vomit

by

On the wall of a dark room in Reykjavík’s Hafnarhusið art museum, a stream of brightly coloured icons is fizzing out of the ground. Triggered by the tiniest sound, they erupt onto the wall at every footstep or word, tumbling into a huge pile and bobbing around like Pop Art Cheerios. Some are familiar, some are less so–classic cartoon characters wobble around alongside unfamiliar product logos and Chinese lettering. “This idea originated in Singapore,” says Mojoko, a.k.a. Steve Lawler, who works with programmer Shang Liang on the project. “It was designed for a children’s exhibition at a museum. We were

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Banksy In Iceland?

by

Banksy may have been to Iceland. A while ago. And he may have left a mark or two. This has not been verified, but whoever did the stencil accompanying this article would in any case surely acknowledge being under the distinguished anonymous British street-artist’s influence. We will leave it up to readers to figure out exactly where this is. The photo was taken by Claudia Regina, in 2012. Apparently, one Graham Lloyd also spotted the piece in 2012. Locals seem to have discovered the artwork more recently, as images shot this summer have started circulating on social media. Also in

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Urbanization On Paper: A European Narrative

by

Spark Design Space has a clean minimalist facade, a welcome place to rest your eyes next to the garishly painted corrugated tin front of its neighbour Kiki. The large glass windows show the dozens of posters tiled on the back walls of the building, each in a different colour and arranged to make a gradient from purple to red to orange to green in more subtle counterpoint to Kiki’s unsubtle rainbow. The posters are Paolo Gianfrancesco’s print show `Urban Shape,’ up now until September 26. Each one is a map of a different European capital, derived from the open source

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Tying A Ribbon On Biophilia

by

Sitting upstairs at Iðnó, pouring out a cup of coffee in a fetching fluorescent yellow ensemble, an animated Björk is expressing how pleased and surprised she is that people still want to talk about her work. “I spoke to someone earlier who had been online researching all the Biophilia set lists and comparing them,” smiles Björk, “and I was like, ‘respect!’ It’s crazy that people actually still care, or can be bothered.” She hasn’t done a press day for three years. The last time seems a long time ago, back when Biophilia was being unveiled to the world—the album app

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Come Fly With me

by

Elvar Örn is a professional photographer and filmmaker with a passion for aerial photography. He’s traveled the world, from the deserts of Namibia, to icy Antarctica, and the highlands of Iceland. He’s explored a wide range of techniques in the art of photography, and he’s delved deeply into high-quality, archival printing processes. In collaboration with Gallerí List, select works of his aerial photography from the Icelandic highlands will be on display at Sólon Bistro starting September 15. I chatted with Elvar about his upcoming exhibition and his craft of printmaking more generally. Your passion is aerial photography. What drew you

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Go PONG Harpa Now!

by

Ever wanted to play arcade classic ‘Pong’ on the massive Harpa facade? Great, because until August 31st you can–so long as you have a smartphone. PONG is an interactive multimedia art piece by Atli Bollason and Owen Hindley. If you go to Arnarhóll (the grassy hill overlooking Harpa with a statue of Iceland’s founding father Ingólfur Arnarson at the top) you can log on to a special wireless network, join a queue and then take control of either pong-paddle by tilting your mobile device. The game itself is then rendered in real time on Harpa’s facade using the 714 LED

Show Me More!