A Grapevine service announcement LOOK BUSY! Bárðarbunga Volcano Watch: The Morning Edition
Culture
Art
2011 Sequences Art Festival: Call for Submissions!

2011 Sequences Art Festival: Call for Submissions!

Words by

Published November 5, 2010

SEQUENCES Art Festival is an annual independently run festival, established in Reykjavík in 2006 by four artist-run galleries. Its aim is to produce and present progressive visual art with a special emphasis on time-based art, such as performances, sonic works, video art, art in public space, and to create a cross-platform for these art forms. The fifth Sequences Art Festival will be held from April 1-10, 2011, and promises a range of performances, happenings, discussions and lectures, involving a number of Icelandic and international artists.  Sequences will accept applications until November 12.

  • More information Website
  • Address for Submissions: SEQUENCES, Nýlistasafnið, Skúlagata 28, 101 Reykjavík Iceland


Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

A Steady Heartbeat

by

The Reykjavík Dance Festival is no stranger to flexibility and experimentation. Founded in 2002, the festival has provided Icelandic and international choreographers an unparalleled platform to showcase their work to an audience that may not have exposure to the world of contemporary dance. In 2012, when the festival turned ten, the coordinating board decided to shake things up and began inviting guest directors to curate the future iterations of the festival. With different curators asking different questions, the festival’s flavour has been distinct each year. This year’s curators and joint directors, Ásgerður Gunnarsdóttir and Alexander Roberts have lofty, daring plans

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

The Creator Of Hangman’s Darker Relatives

by and

Hugleikur Dagsson, the controversial cartoonist famous for his satirical comic strips which often depict stick figures in violent situations involving murder, rape, religion, cannibalism, incest and suicide, enjoys huge popularity in Iceland, as well as an international cult following. Apart from his comic strips, he has also published multiple books, written a couple of stage plays, produced his own television show and done some stand-up comedy. It may be hard to believe, but Hugleikur’s success came almost by accident. As he tells it, he was participating in an art show in Seyðisfjörður during the summer between his second and third

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Poet Tattoos Demand That Minister Resigns

by

Tuesday, August 12, 2014. Poet Bragi Páll Sigurðarson just disclosed his new tattoo. It is situated on his right thigh, just above the knee. Unlike most tattoos, this one is written in Times New Roman. One sentence, split in two lines, it reads: “Hanna Birna, segðu af þér.” That is: “Hanna Birna, resign.” Standard punctuation. The direct message is as clear-cut as the typography. The demand, of course, refers to the scandal surrounding Iceland’s Interior Minister in recent months, which has been duly covered in this paper. I caught Bragi Páll on Facebook to ask him some questions. Well, before

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Land Of The Sodium Sun

by

The Icelandic winter is supposed to be dark and fierce with a view of the stars and sometimes the Aurora Borealis stretching overhead. It’s cold and windy, sure, but that’s not what bothers photographer Stuart Richardson. It’s the garish illumination of the streetlights that have pervaded the city and are bleeding out into the countryside. “When you’re actually experiencing the Icelandic winter, everything is orange. Everything is the colour of the streetlights,” he says. “When we experience the winter here, we’re not really feeling, we’re not really seeing anything outside of these streetlights.” Stuart, an American who has been living

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Creativity For All

by

Set in the glacial crevasse town of Seyðisfjörður, the music and arts festival LungA is a buzzing hive of creativity and pure, weird art. The weeklong festival is packed with different workshops held during the week and then topped off by a final presentation of the art and music on Saturday. The Endgame The presentation starts off with a mysterious team building exercise led by the Performance/Interaction workshop that culminates with an arm wrestling match and then waltz. Next, we’re shuffled into the auditorium/cafeteria to listen to the concert given by the members of the Automata workshop, all performed on

Culture
Art
<?php the_title(); ?>

Short-Circuit to Idiocy

by

Icelandic artist Snorri Ásmundsson recently distributed a video on YouTube, that has since been publicized through most Icelandic-speaking news media. In the video, Snorri sings the Israeli national hymn, Hatikvah, in Hebrew. It seems objectively safe to say that the artist sings it badly: the unimpressive singing seems to be a deliberate part of the piece. The music was arranged and produced by Futuregrapher, while Marteinn Þórsson handled cinematography and editing. All that work is professional enough to be uninteresting compared with the video’s content. Ingredients The video starts with a close-up of a woman wearing a hijab or a

Show Me More!